Tag Archives: Ashiatsu

FAQ: Do You Do Deep Tissue Massage?

Deep Tissue Massage

This is a fairly common question, but let’s back up a minute. Massage menus can be overwhelming with a variety of styles like Swedish, Deep Tissue, Therapeutic, Thai, and Trigger Point. Swedish and Deep Tissue are the most common styles of massage, but what the heck are they?

What is the difference between Swedish and Deep Tissue Massage?

Swedish massage is what most people picture when they hear the word massage. In the US, it’s what most therapists learn first in massage school. It’s characterized by long gliding and kneading massage strokes using massage oil or creme.

Deep Tissue massage generally utilizes some of the same massage strokes as Swedish Massage. The difference is that the massage is slower and more focused on areas of tension or pain and the pressure may be firmer.

Deep Tissue Massage should hurt, right?

When folks request deep tissue they are usually looking for relief from muscle aches and pains. Folks either want firm pressure, or they want the massage to hurt. No pain, no gain, right? Not quite. Firm pressure can be therapeutic, but painful pressure? Not so much. There is a difference between an intense or vigorous massage and a painful one.

Painful massage that causes you to hold your breath or clench your jaw is counterproductive. The goal of massage is to relax you and your muscles, so the pressure shouldn’t be causing you to tense up.

Deep Tissue Massage at Restoring Balance

I find that firm, broad pressure works great for muscle aches and pains. The foot is the perfect tool for delivering this more comfortable pressure, as opposed to pointy thumbs and elbows. And the heel of the foot is great for when a more focused pressure is needed.

So, basically, yes, I do deep massage. If that’s what you are looking for, be sure to schedule a barefoot massage. Right now, I offer Ashiatsu, but will soon be adding Fijian Massage. Most styles of massage can be blended so you get the best massage for you. (I highly recommend adding hot stones.)

If you are looking for traditional deep massage, we offer that to! Schedule a Massage Therapy appointment with Lucas or Lola.

Still not sure, what style of massage to get? Contact us.

 

 

Ashiatsu: What to Expect

Before Your Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Session:

  • Drink water to stay hydrated.
  • It’s a good idea to arrive a few minutes early to allow yourself time to relax a bit. Rushing is no way to start your relaxing massage!
  • Ashiatsu is typically performed directly on the skin. So I’ll leave the room while you disrobe and get cozy under the sheet on the massage table.
  • Nervous about taking your clothes off? No worries, I can adjust the massage, just wear comfortable clothing. And rest assured, if you do decide to take it all off, you will be under a sheet and only the part of your body being massaged will be uncovered.

During Your Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Session:

  • Allow the full weight of your body to sink into the table and take full, deep breaths.
  • I will inquire about the pressure and your level of comfort. Remember: this is your massage. If you are too cold or hot, if the pressure is too light, deep, or painful or if anything is interfering with you relaxing, it is important to speak up.
  • Ashiatsu has the potential to be a very deep massage, but it should not be painful. If the pressure is causing you to hold your breath or clench your jaw, it’s super important to speak up. 

After Your Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Session:

  • I will leave and give you time to get dressed. Don’t get up too quickly.
  • Your muscles will be very supple, so take a few precautions for the next 48 hours.

You should not:

  • Sit for long periods of time in a hard chair to avoid compressing your back for 24 hours. (For example: flying, sitting in a theatre, playing cards for a extended amount of time.)
  • Lift heavy objects.
  • Engage in activities that involve forceful twisting (like golfing or playing baseball).
  • Drink heavy alcohol.

You should:

  • Drink water to stay hydrated.
  • Do gentle, easy passive stretching  (Sit on the edge of a chair and hang forward.)
  • Wear back or neck support if your work requires rough activity daily.
  • Treat yourself to a hot sauna, steam room, or hot tub.
  • Lie on the floor with your legs up on a chair.

 

What is Ashiatsu?

Known as the “Deepest Most Luxurious Massage on the Planet,” Ashiatsu is a  profoundly relaxing massage that can be modified for light pressure to very deep. Basically, it’s a massage performed smoothly with my feet while overhead parallel wooden bars provide balance as I work.

You use your feet!?

Yes!  No worries though! I clean my feet before and after every massage and I take care to keep my feet smooth and soft.

So…you’re walking on people?…

I actually leave one foot on the massage table for balance and stability, while using the other foot to massage. By shifting my weight from one foot to the other I can easily adjust the amount of pressure to your comfort. Ashiatsu is not a “No Pain, No Gain” massage — your safety and well-being are my top concern.

Should I get an Ashiatsu Massage? 

Are you looking to relax or relieve stress? The slow, flowing strokes of an Ashiatsu massage make for a deeply relaxing experience.

Do you like firm pressure? The foot provides a more comfortable pressure, as opposed to pointy thumbs and elbows. Barefoot massage allows me to provide a deeper pressure than is possible using my hands.

Are you looking to relieve muscles aches and pains? The broad, consistent pressure of Ashiatsu is the perfect match for sore muscles.

Ashiatsu isn’t the right massage for everybody. And in some cases, massage altogether may not be right for you.  If you have any concerns, please discuss them with your therapist prior to scheduling a massage.

Some reasons you should not receive Ashiatsu:

  • You are pregnant or trying to conceive. (You’ll want to contact a prenatal massage therapist instead.)
  • You have had any type of implants in the last 9 months
  • You have osteoporosis or fragile bones
  • You are on blood thinning medication (including high doses of aspirin)
  • You are in cancer treatment or recovery (See more about oncology massage here.)

Again, if you have any concerns about whether Ashiatsu is right for you, please discuss them with your massage therapist. In most cases, even if you can not receive Ashiatsu, massage may be modified so it is appropriate for you.