Tag Archives: FAQ

What Should I Do During My Massage?

Massage is kinda weird.

We aren’t a high-touch society.  We don’t touch strangers, and we may even feel weird touching our friends and family.  So it can be awkward to get massage.  We don’t know what we’re supposed to do.

Just telling us to “Relax!” doesn’t cut it.

To start, allow the full weight of your body to sink into the table and take full, deep breaths. This can be difficult. Don’t be hard on yourself. If you notice your mind racing, thinking about all the things left to do today, bring your attention back to your breath. If you’re clenching your jaw rethinking an argument with a friend, allow the muscle to soften.

Again, this can be difficult. Don’t be hard on yourself. But if you’re clenching your jaw or holding your breath because the massage hurts…

What if it hurts?

Sometimes, when getting a massage, folks describe feeling a “good pain” or a “good hurt.” It’s an intense sensation, but it feels right. Like sweet relief. This is totally fine.

But sometimes, pain is just pain. If you find yourself tensing your muscles in an effort to avoid the pain, tell your massage therapist.  We can adjust the massage so it doesn’t hurt. We’re here to help you feel better, not worse.

Should I talk?

Although some people prefer to talk throughout the massage, don’t feel like you have to make conversation with the massage therapist. Many people close their eyes and try to relax. Your massage therapist should take the cue from you.

But please be sure to speak up if you:

  • Feel too hot or cold
  • Are in pain
  • Have any questions about the massage
  • Forgot to mention a health issue during the consultation

What if I fall asleep?…or drool?!

Falling asleep during a massage is very common. I almost always fall asleep when I get a massage. It’s totally fine to snore or drool.

What if I have to pee?

Please tell us. We have a bathroom in our office. Holding it for the duration of the massage is not relaxing!

So there you have it. A few guidelines for what to do during your massage. Did I miss anything? Let me know.

And remember, your massage therapist will ask about the pressure and your level of comfort. This is your massage. If you are too cold or hot, if the pressure is too light, deep, or painful or if anything is interfering with you relaxing it is important to speak up.

Book my massage now

Massage Myth #3: You can’t get a massage while breastfeeding.

Photo by Bonnie Kittle on Unsplash

Welcome to myth #3 on our reasons-you-can’t-get-a-massage-myth series.  Be sure to check out Myth #1 here and Myth #2 here.

Myth #3: You can’t get a massage while breastfeeding.

This myth is so insidious, because nobody needs a massage more than postpartum parents. The idea behind this misunderstanding is the belief that massage somehow squeezes toxins out of a person’s tissues, which are then released into the bloodstream. Since the body is “toxic” after a massage, the story goes, any breast milk produced at this time is also toxic. The choice is between “pumping and dumping” after receiving bodywork, or avoiding massage therapy altogether until the child is weaned.

Fortunately, this isn’t even one of those half-true-but-it’s-complicated situations; it’s 100% false, no question. Normal cell byproducts are filtered by the body and are not a danger to breastmilk, and massage doesn’t release toxins anyway. And keep in mind that massage can improve depression, body image, and (perhaps most importantly to new parents) SLEEP.

Need a break? Schedule your appointment today.

Why is My Massage Therapist Always Telling Me to Drink So Much Water?

Mason jar filled with water
Photo by Ethan Sykes on Unsplash

If you’ve ever gotten a massage, chances are good your massage therapist has told you that you should drink a lot of water afterward. Many believe that deep tissue massage releases toxins from your muscles and that water is needed to flush it out. Let’s start there.

What toxins are we taking about here?

Toxins are a bit of buzzword. Seems every time you turn around someone’s trying to sell you something to “detoxify” your body, like a special diet or a fancy drink. They don’t really mention what “toxins” you need to ditch. So we’re not quite clear what toxins we’re talking about.

Is massage detoxifying?

Often massage textbooks teach budding massage therapists that massage breaks up knots, releasing toxins in your muscles and flushing them out by increasing circulation in your body. Water is supposed to help with the “flushing.”

This is based on old, but pervasive myth about how massage works. We want to understand how massage works, and the idea that it removes toxic substances that are causing pain is a simple, appealing explanation.

To be clear, toxins do actually exist. Any chemical in a high enough concentration can be toxic to the body. Some things like pesticides and lead are more toxic than others. But massage doesn’t help get rid of these things.  When these things do end up in our body, our body has ways of dealing with them, like processing in the liver or sweating.

So, should I drink water after my massage?

The reason many massage therapists recommend drinking water directly after massage isn’t supported by science. But our bodies are composed of quite a bit of water. It’s essential to life.

I’m usually thirsty after a massage. That’s why I offer you water.

 

Massage Myth #1: You can’t get a massage during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Contraindication is a long word with a simple meaning: a reason you shouldn’t receive a particular treatment, such as a massage. There are local contraindications—things like a small wound—that shouldn’t be massaged directly, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still get a perfectly good massage on other parts of your body. Then there are general contraindications, or situations in which you shouldn’t get a massage at all. Contraindications can be an illness like the flu, a treatment or medication like a strong blood thinner, or even something environmental, like a bedbug infestation at home.

But there’s another kind of contraindication that also seems to make the rounds on a regular basis: the mythological kind. Despite all the scientific advancements we’ve made in studying massage therapy over the years, there are a few persistent misunderstandings that just won’t seem to die. And while tales of mermaids and unicorns can brighten an otherwise dull day, these massage myths unfortunately prevent too many people from getting the professional bodywork they deserve.

Photo by Olliss on Unsplash

Myth #1: You can’t get a massage during the first trimester of pregnancy.

This myth is based around the idea that there is an acupressure point around the ankles that can induce premature labor. Since the first three months of pregnancy are also the time of the highest risk of miscarriage, the wisdom says that it’s best not to get a massage at all during this time.

Of course, this doesn’t take into account the fact that pregnant women regularly do all sorts of things that put pressure on the ankles.

Like wear shoes.

And given that most people go at least a few weeks before they’re even aware that they’ve conceived, this is basically saying that anyone with the sort of working parts that could lead to pregnancy should stay away from the massage table… just in case.

Luckily, there’s no evidence for any of this. Still, it’s a good practice to give your massage therapist a heads up if you know that you’re pregnant so that they can be prepared to make adjustments for things like loosening ligaments or a sudden sensitivity to smells.

One caveat, if  you are having complications with your pregnancy, talk to your doctor or call us before scheduling: (217) 552-1670.

Schedule your appointment today.

How Much Should My Massage Hurt?

low back massage, massage therapist using elbowFolks seek out massage for many different reasons, including relaxation, stress relief, and pain relief. Right off the top, if you’re looking to relax or de-stress, a painful or uncomfortable massage is not the way to go.

Many of of our customers come in for massage looking for relief from muscle aches and pains. Often folks think that, to achieve this, the massage has gotta hurt. A lot. No pain, no gain! Right? We’ve all heard it, but is more pain the way to relieve pain? And if so, how much pain?

What do we mean by “hurt”?

Sometimes, when getting a massage, folks describe feeling a “good pain” or a “good hurt.” It’s an intense sensation, but it feels right. Like sweet relief. So pain isn’t maybe the right word to use to describe this sensation.

But sometimes, pain is just pain. And if you tune into your body, you may find yourself holding your breath, or clenching your jaw, tensing your muscles in an effort to avoid the pain.

Is pain helpful for relieving pain?

There is a difference between an intense or vigorous massage and a painful one. An intense feeling of “good pain” can be therapeutic. But a painful massage that causes you to tense your muscles in an effort to avoid the pain? Not so much.

So, how much should your massage hurt?

Not at all.

You may feel an intense sensation that many describe as “good pain” for lack of a better phrase. And that is perfectly normal and helpful.

But if you’re just feeling plain ol’ pain, if you’re holding your breath or clenching your fists, that’s no good. Tell your massage therapist if it hurts, or if you need less pressure in that area (or for the whole massage), or even if an area is too painful to be touched at all. We’re here to help you feel better, not worse.

Ready to schedule your massage? Book here.

 

Massage Safety

Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

We need to talk about massage and safety.

If you haven’t already heard, Buzzfeed recently broke a story about abuse occurring in Massage Envy franchise locations. There has been a lot of conversation about the story online and in the news, which you may have seen. What you probably haven’t seen (unless you’re a part of our profession) is the uproar it has caused in the massage therapy community. Horror is a common emotion: who would do such a thing? Sadness: for the people who will be too fearful to receive the bodywork they need out of fear for their safety. And anger. Plenty of anger.

To be clear, this anger isn’t for the thousands of ethical massage therapists, managers, and support staff at Massage Envy. Whether you care for their business model or not, the vast majority of Massage Envy employees are out there doing their jobs, caring for clients, and earning a living, and they deserve our support. The anger is for perpetrators who violated the faith placed in them by trusting clients; the franchise owners, managers, and employees who allowed it to happen; and the organization that provided neither sufficient guidance nor real consequences for the people they allow to work in their name.

We want  you to know that we as a community of massage therapists are trying to do our best to hold ourselves and our organizations accountable, and work for changes at Massage Envy and elsewhere to make sure this never happens again.

But we also want you to know that we care about you. As a client and as an individual. Because you have a right to feel safe while getting a massage. And this goes whether you’re receiving a massage here or anywhere else.

So here are some promises to you:

Our promise

We will remain vigilant in our hiring. This includes extensive reference checks as well as basics such as double checking claims regarding certifications and licensure.

We re-commit to adhere to all state laws and abide by the the massage profession’s code of ethics.

We will give you access. You can check the status of the license of any massage therapist in the state here.1 If you need help finding information on out-of-state therapists as well, you can ask and we will direct you to the appropriate resources.

We will be proactive and regularly solicit feedback from clients about their experience. Big or small, positive or negative, we want to know your experience so that we can do our best and stop major issues before they start.

We will investigate ANY complaint of therapist misconduct, and share this process openly with you.

And as part of this, you have our word that:

  • We encourage you to report any misconduct to your massage therapist’s supervisor2, to their licensing agency, to law enforcement3, or to all three.    
  • We will investigate any report of misconduct.
  • We will not permit a massage therapist under investigation to work with clients until the investigation has concluded.
  • We will maintain written records of every report and investigation.
  • We will report the incident to the licensing board, law enforcement, and other agencies as appropriate.
  • We will support clients in whatever course of action they choose to take.

The power is yours

There is a natural power differential when a person decides to get a massage. When one person is trained, familiar with the environment, standing up, and fully dressed, and the other has none of those advantages, it can be easy to feel like someone receiving a massage has no power at all. But it’s important to know that, no matter how much of an expert a person may be in massage, you are the expert on your experience. And as the expert on you:

  • You have the right to tell your massage therapist to change or stop what they are doing for any reason.
  • You have the right to end your massage session at any time for any reason.
  • You have the right to stop seeing your massage therapist, or to choose a new massage therapist, for any reason.
  • You have the right to report any misconduct to to your massage therapist’s supervisor2, to their licensing agency, to law enforcement3, or to all three.

Again, you have a right to feel safe while getting a massage.

And since we’re having an open conversation about safety, we also need to be clear about one more thing: massage therapists also have a right to feel safe while giving a massage.

Ensuring the safety of massage therapists from clients who would harass, assault, or otherwise harm them is another conversation that you might not always be privy to as a client, but is a major point of discourse in the massage therapy community. For whatever reason, there are still people out there who confuse (or choose to conflate) massage therapy with sex work, and feel free to act on that impulse regardless of the wishes of the therapist in question.

If this is obviously problematic to you, like it is to 99% of the people in the world, then you don’t really need the following reminder.

But if you’re in that 1% and believe you’re owed sexual favors by virtue of existing and rely on that sense of personal entitlement while preying on massage therapists, especially those who are inexperienced or economically disadvantaged, here’s a wake-up call for you:

Your massage therapist also has rights

  • Massage therapists have the right to refuse to provide any service they feel would be inappropriate, out of their scope of practice, uncomfortable, or unsafe.
  • Massage therapists have the right to end a session at any time if they feel unsafe with a client.
  • Massage therapists have the right to no longer see a client they feel unsafe with or unqualified to treat.
  • Massage therapists have the right to report a client’s inappropriate behavior to their supervisor and to law enforcement.
  • Massage therapy business owners have the right to stop scheduling a client for inappropriate behavior, to ban them from the premises, and to warn other local therapists about them. (And massage therapists do talk to one another. It’s a small profession.)

In the end, everything is better off in the light.

It’s better to have a major exposé in the news than for abuse to go on unaccounted-for. It’s better to ask hard questions before choosing a new massage therapist than to go into a session anxious or afraid. And it’s definitely better for massage therapists to address the issue of safety head-on, rather than pretending the concern doesn’t exist.

We all have a right to feel safe.

Hopefully, if we continue to work together to shine light into the dark corners of the world, all of us will. 


(1) State of Illinois Massage Therapy License Numbers for current staff:

  • Laura “Lola” McQueen 227018703
  • Karyn Claflin 227016354
  • Lucas Crawford 227018421

(2) Karyn Claflin, Owner, Restoring Balance Massage Therapy and Yoga
karyn@balancechampaign.com
cell (217) 352-7944

(3)Champaign Police Department
Emergency Calls: 9-1-1
Non-emergency: 217-333-8911
82 E. University Avenue
Champaign, IL 61820
217-351-4545

FAQ: Do You Do Deep Tissue Massage?

Deep Tissue Massage

This is a fairly common question, but let’s back up a minute. Massage menus can be overwhelming with a variety of styles like Swedish, Deep Tissue, Therapeutic, Thai, and Trigger Point. Swedish and Deep Tissue are the most common styles of massage, but what the heck are they?

What is the difference between Swedish and Deep Tissue Massage?

Swedish massage is what most people picture when they hear the word massage. In the US, it’s what most therapists learn first in massage school. It’s characterized by long gliding and kneading massage strokes using massage oil or creme.

Deep Tissue massage generally utilizes some of the same massage strokes as Swedish Massage. The difference is that the massage is slower and more focused on areas of tension or pain and the pressure may be firmer.

Deep Tissue Massage should hurt, right?

When folks request deep tissue they are usually looking for relief from muscle aches and pains. Folks either want firm pressure, or they want the massage to hurt. No pain, no gain, right? Not quite. Firm pressure can be therapeutic, but painful pressure? Not so much. There is a difference between an intense or vigorous massage and a painful one.

Painful massage that causes you to hold your breath or clench your jaw is counterproductive. The goal of massage is to relax you and your muscles, so the pressure shouldn’t be causing you to tense up.

Deep Tissue Massage at Restoring Balance

I find that firm, broad pressure works great for muscle aches and pains. The foot is the perfect tool for delivering this more comfortable pressure, as opposed to pointy thumbs and elbows. And the heel of the foot is great for when a more focused pressure is needed.

So, basically, yes, I do deep massage. If that’s what you are looking for, be sure to schedule a barefoot massage. Right now, I offer Ashiatsu, but will soon be adding Fijian Massage. Most styles of massage can be blended so you get the best massage for you. (I highly recommend adding hot stones.)

If you are looking for traditional deep massage, we offer that to! Schedule a Massage Therapy appointment with Lucas or Lola.

Still not sure, what style of massage to get? Contact us.

 

 

FAQ: Do you ever get massage?

This is one the questions I get asked most as a massage therapist. And the answer is “YES!” Of course, I get massage. I love massage and I get one every chance I get. But at the very least two sixty minute massages a month. Ninety minutes if I can fit it into my schedule and budget. Sixty minutes just goes by too fast!

I get massage for the same reasons you get massage.

To relax. To relieve my aches and pains. To take a break from this busy world we live in where it seems like someone or something is always demanding your attention.

I get massage because it makes me a better massage therapist.

Not only does massage keep me feeling great so I can perform my best, it’s also one of the ways I make sure your massage is top-notch. When I get massage, I’m reminded of all the little things that make for a great massage.

It’s why I keep an eye pillow handy and have a cozy heating pad on my massage table. It’s how I learned to keep eucalyptus or peppermint essential oil close by, in case your nose gets stuffy. It’s how I discovered that combining Ashiatsu and Hot Stone Massage is out-of-this-world amazing!

When was your last massage? If you can’t remember, it’s been too long! Schedule one here.

Ashiatsu: What to Expect

Before Your Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Session:

  • Drink water to stay hydrated.
  • It’s a good idea to arrive a few minutes early to allow yourself time to relax a bit. Rushing is no way to start your relaxing massage!
  • Ashiatsu is typically performed directly on the skin. So I’ll leave the room while you disrobe and get cozy under the sheet on the massage table.
  • Nervous about taking your clothes off? No worries, I can adjust the massage, just wear comfortable clothing. And rest assured, if you do decide to take it all off, you will be under a sheet and only the part of your body being massaged will be uncovered.

During Your Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Session:

  • Allow the full weight of your body to sink into the table and take full, deep breaths.
  • I will inquire about the pressure and your level of comfort. Remember: this is your massage. If you are too cold or hot, if the pressure is too light, deep, or painful or if anything is interfering with you relaxing, it is important to speak up.
  • Ashiatsu has the potential to be a very deep massage, but it should not be painful. If the pressure is causing you to hold your breath or clench your jaw, it’s super important to speak up. 

After Your Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Session:

  • I will leave and give you time to get dressed. Don’t get up too quickly.
  • Your muscles will be very supple, so take a few precautions for the next 48 hours.

You should not:

  • Sit for long periods of time in a hard chair to avoid compressing your back for 24 hours. (For example: flying, sitting in a theatre, playing cards for a extended amount of time.)
  • Lift heavy objects.
  • Engage in activities that involve forceful twisting (like golfing or playing baseball).
  • Drink heavy alcohol.

You should:

  • Drink water to stay hydrated.
  • Do gentle, easy passive stretching  (Sit on the edge of a chair and hang forward.)
  • Wear back or neck support if your work requires rough activity daily.
  • Treat yourself to a hot sauna, steam room, or hot tub.
  • Lie on the floor with your legs up on a chair.

 

What You Get With Your 60 Minute Massage

 

Massage Therapy ChampaignA Full Hour

A 60 minute massage is 60 minutes of massage. It feels weird to have to clarify that, but it’s not the case for every business. Massage Envy’s hour is only 50 minutes. Even some full service spas operate on a 50-minute hour. But in my office, treatments last exactly as long as indicated. (Unless you’re late, then I may have to adjust accordingly.)

That’s a whole hour, just for you.

Personalized for you

For a whole hour, you are the reason we’re in the room. No ringing phone, email alerts, or people demanding your attention.

You get your massage therapist’s full attention. We don’t have a set routine that we use for every client, every time. Each time you come in, we’ll ask what your needs are that day. We’ll check in a few times during the massage, and you should feel free to speak up if you need us to change what we’re doing. Need silence? An extra blanket? A full hour foot massage?  Done. It’s a massage your way.

Ease of Scheduling

I rarely think of scheduling massage at a time that is actually convenient to call.  Or I do, but I get voicemail and have to play phone tag. That’s why we have convenient online scheduling. You can schedule your massage online right here.  And if you don’t see a time that works for you, send us an email with some times you’re looking for and maybe we can make it work. If we can’t make it work, we can refer you to another therapist whose schedule works better for you. We get massage frequently, so we know a lot of great local massage therapists.

If you prefer, you can call us at  217-552-1670 to schedule. (We may need to play a bit of phone tag since we may need to call you back between clients.)

Commitment to High Quality Massage

We’re continually learning more to make your massage top notch. We’ve done hundreds of massages. They were all just prep for your massage.

Your comfort is a priority. We’ve got pillow/towel propping tricks to keep you cozy laying on your side if you can’t lay on your stomach or your back or if you can’t breathe with your face in the face cradle. We got this. We will get you cozy so you can fully relax and enjoy your massage.

Clinical Prudence

We won’t practice any techniques that are unsafe for you and your health condition. In general, people on blood thinners shouldn’t be getting massage with very firm pressure. Ditto for folks with osteoporosis. It’s also unwise to use hot stones on people who have had lymph nodes removed. These are called contraindications. And we won’t mess around with them.

Very rarely, massage in general may not be a good idea for you and we will be unable to give you a massage. But we can almost always adapt the massage so it’s safe and effective for you.

No Hassle Loyalty Program

If you get your next (hour or longer) massage within six weeks of your last one, you save $10. Save $5 for 30 minute massages.  We track it for you. No monthly subscription. No card to remember and keep track of.

High quality massage oil, cream, and lotion

Have you ever left a massage feeling slimy or greasy? Not here. Mostly, we use Hobacare Jojoba. It’s not actually an oil, it’s a wax ester, and it’s pretty close to your skin’s natural oil.

Have you ever had a reaction to a product you put on your skin? I have pretty sensitive skin so I’m careful about what I put on it. Pure jojoba is also non-allergenic. The rest of the lotions and spa products we use come from companies that value natural ingredients and skip skin irritating fillers.

You get to support a local business

Locally owned and operated. Just a tiny local business with awesome massage therapists making a living, and participating in the same communities they serve. When you pay $80 for a massage, you can be certain that money is staying in the local economy.

All that, plus all the amazing benefits of massage, for only $80. What are you waiting for? Schedule your massage here.